Frank Barron – Psychology of Creativity

Posted on Updated on

FRANK BARRON
Frank Xavier Barron
(June 17, 1922, Lansford, Pennsylvania – October 6, 2002, Santa Cruz, California) (Aged 80)
Nationality: United States
Category: Scientists
Occupation: Psychologist, Professor, Non-Fiction Writer, Poet
Specification: A pioneer in the psychology of creativity and in the study of human personality, professor of Psychology at the University of California Santa Cruz. Psychology of Creativity
Gender: Male
Family: Barron married Nancy Jean Camp in 1961, and they had three children: Francis Charles Xavier, Brigid Jessica Sarah, and Anthea Rose Maeve.
Education: In 1937 he attended La Salle University, from which he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in 1942. He received his Master of Arts from the University of Minnesota in 1948, and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1950.
Influences: Dante, Augustine, Yeats, Galton,Pavlov, Fechner, W. James, Freud, Jung, Bergson, Teilhard de Chardin, Binet and Piaget.
Career: Barron served the U.S. Army (1943 – 1946) in Europe as a medical sergeant. He taught as a visiting professor at Harvard, Bryn Mawr College, University of Hawaii, Wesleyan and from 1949 to 1968 worked as a founding member of the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research (IPAR) at UC Berkeley. From 1969 until his retirement in 1992 he taught courses in personality and human creativityat the University of California, Santa Cruz.
Personality: Barron had a gentle heart, great sense of humor and impressed with his erudition , subtlety of mind and love of language. He was fond of poetry and wrote a book of poems “Ghosts”.

Read more: genvive

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s